Just as you wouldn’t publish a book or a scholarly article without a title, webpages should not be published without page titles for the same reason-- without titles, they won’t be indexed or found. 


Webpage titles are used in a number of ways:

  • Appear in the title bar of a web browser window
  • Appear as the hyperlinked text in search results
  • Are used when pages are saved in browser favorites or bookmarks
  • Are used to create the history list that shows users their recently visited pages


Expectations for Page Titles


1. Each page should have a unique title and contain keywords when possible


Titles will also follow this format: Page Name - Winona State University .  A unique, keyword-rich page title increases the chances that people will find that specific page at the top of their search results list.


2. Titles should be no longer than 70 characters


A unique, keyword-rich page title increases the chances that people will find that specific page at the top of their search results list.


3. Page titles should match the breadcrumb and reflect the URL name


Humans and search engine bots both appreciate matching page titles, breadcrumbs and URLs. It shows consistency and reinforces the relevance of keywords.


4. Titles should accurately and succinctly describe the information provided on the page


Misleading page titles are frustrating to people who clicked on a link in the search results or from another webpage looking for specific information. If they don't find the answers they expected, they will have a bad impression of WSU. Similarly, search engine bots will penalize a webpage if the page title doesn't connect to the content.


For example, https://www.winona.edu/international-services/next-steps.asp

  1. It has the page title: Next Steps for Admitted Students – Winona State University
  2. The page title is 58 characters total.
  3. The page title is similar to the URL and is reflected in the breadcrumb
  4. The page title does describe the content of the webpage